Below are some sets of drawings that I have done for a variety of projects, mostly a long time ago. Note that the artwork is rather crude, and some of the labels, captions, and even the spelling exhibit a somewhat primitive understanding of petrology and English. Nonetheless, I hope you gather from these that drawings can frequently offer insight of a process or view that is difficult to capture with a photo or computer-rendered illustration.

 

Figures done in the 1977 Petrology class with Peter Robinson, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Hawaii suite.
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HW-2A. Hawaii alkali basalt.

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HW-2A. Hawaii alkali basalt.

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HW-2C. Hawaii alkali olivine basalt.

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HW-3. Hawaii olivine basalt.

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HW-3. Hawaii olivine basalt.

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HW-8A. Hawaii olivine basalt.

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HW-8B. Hawaii olivine basalt.

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HW-9B. Hawaii olivine basalt.

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HW-11A. Hawaii trachyte obsidian.

 

Figures done in the 1977 Petrology class with Peter Robinson, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Salem suite.
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SA-4A. Alkali fayalite granite.

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SA-4B. Alkali fayalite granite.

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SA-4D. Alkali fayalite granite.

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SA-4D. Basalt dike cutting granite, metamorphosed.

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SA-5. Hedenbergite granite.

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SA-6B. Alkali granite.

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SA-6B. Alkali granite.

 

Figures done in the 1977 Petrology class with Peter Robinson, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, assorted rocks.
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7Q5. Amphibolite facies calc-silicate rock.

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CHL. Greenschist facies chloritoid-chlorite-muscovite schist.

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Elizabethtown, NY. Two-pyroxene granulite (only one pyroxene illustrated here).

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O5F8. Amphibolite facies calc-silicate rock.

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UO1B. Amphibolite facies pelitic schist.

 

Masters thesis illustrations on retrograded pelitic schists, New Salem area, Massachusetts.
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Sillimanite in slightly and severely retrograded schists.

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Garnet in little-retrograded sample.

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Fresh vs. retrograded and completely pseudomorphed staurolite.

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Partially and largely retrograded garnets, pseudomorphed mostly by chlorite.

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Partly retrograded garnet, with retrograde chloritoid. See illustration below.

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Chloritoid in partially retrograded schist, also showing ilmenite partly retrograded to anatase.

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Partially retrograded biotite containing lenses of retrograde K-feldspar.

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Prograde ilmenite and retrograde anatase in transmitted and reflected light

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Sphene (titanite), ilmenite, and anatase, plus analytical data.

 

Spots on garnet analyzed by electron microprobe, from Hollocher, 1987.
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Several garnets showing garnets in various states of retrograding in various relationships to chlorite.

 

Sketches made for research paper summaries, Volcanology class taught by J.M. Rhodes and Marty Godchaux.
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Ash beds in the Mt. Rainier area.

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Volcano top elevations, original point unclear to me.

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Volcano top elevations based on magma chamber depths.

 

Field sketches made for some 1980's field trip guidebooks.
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Orthopyroxene tonalite partial melts in amphibolite, Rt. 9, Belchertown, Massachusetts.

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In-situ melt veins in two-pyroxene granulite, Masapaug Rd. near Sturbridge, MA.

 

Slides for a presentation on retrograde metamorphism, M.S. thesis, circa 1979 (back when I had a sense of humor).
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Retrograde metamorphism: during cooling or or more complex polymetamorphism.

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Retrograde sillimanite-out reaction.

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Retrograde staurolite-out reaction.

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Retrograde chloritoid-in reaction.

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Retrograde hypothetical reaction.

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Retrograde hypothetical reaction.

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Retrograde hypothetical reaction.

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Retrograde garnet-out reaction progression.

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Retrograde garnet-out reaction.

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Sans gloves, they actually look rather like this.

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Muscovite projection explanation.

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Muscovite projection result.

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Prograde phase relations.

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Edgewise view of the AKFM tetrahedron.

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Edgewise view of the AKFM tetrahedron showing the retrograde staurolite-out reaction.

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Edgewise view of the AKFM tetrahedron showing the retrograde garnet-out reaction.

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Edgewise view of the AKFM tetrahedron showing the retrograde K-feldspar-in reaction.

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One way to think of why garnets occur in so many assemblages.

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One way to look at oxide and silicate assemblages. Don't take this too seriously.

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Well, haven't you been wondering?